Private Tented Safari Camps in Yala, Udawalawe, Wilpattu and nine other National Parks

Sri Lanka Wildlife Experiences with Mahoora

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It is a well known fact that Sri Lanka has abundance in natural resources that other countries of its size usually do not possess. Three of the most important resources in the country are its series of national parks, wetlands, and the ocean that surrounds it. Although its many residents enjoy the bounty these areas of natural abundance provides, Sri Lanka’s famous hospitality extends to hundreds of thousands of migrants that come to the island every year in search of food and warm accommodations.

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The Udawalawe National Park is located in south-central Sri Lanka, and is covers areas in both the Sabaragamuwa and Uva Provinces. This national park is significant due to its mix of dry and wet zone ecologies and its geographical features that include rocky outcrops, mountains, and bodies of water such as the Udawalawe Reservoir (from which it gets its name) and the Mau Ara Reservoir. The national park is best known for its abundance of Sri Lankan elephants, and is the only National Park in the country where an elephant sighting can be guaranteed on every safari trip. Initially classified as a national park in 1972 as a sanctuary for wildlife displaced by the creation of the Udawalawe Reservoir (in 1969), it is now among Sri Lanka’s most popular national parks.

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Although most famous for its leopards, the Yala National Park is home to a wide variety of other mammals, including several carnivorous, omnivorous, and herbivorous species. The bottom of the food chain is made up of an eclectic collection of trees, shrubs, herbs, cacti, and grasses.

Among the largest of the plant life in the National Park is a species of tree known in Sri Lanka as “Palu” (Manilkara hexandra). These trees, once used for construction and decorative purposes owing to its hard and heavy wood, are now protected in the country owing to how few trees are left in the country, and how important it is to the local wildlife.

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The Yala National Park is home to an impressive range of wildlife, and while Sri Lankan leopards, Sri Lankan elephants, Sri Lankan sloth bears, and a few other mammals take the limelight, its reptilian denizens are hardly noticed. Among the several dozen reptile species in this vast national park are Land Monitors (also known as Bengal Monitors or Common Indian Monitors) (Varanus bengalensis), the larger Water Monitors (Varanus salvator), and several other species, including crocodiles, serpents, and testudines (tortoises, turtles, and terrapins). This story is about a Land Monitor.

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Udawalawe National Park Safari Tour

Udawalawe National Park is one of Sri Lanka’s premier locations for spotting Sri Lankan Elephants (Elephas maximus maximus). It is, in fact, the only national park in Sri Lanka where an elephant sighting is guaranteed every time, no matter the date.

The Udawalawe Reservoir – built in the 1960s – and the Walawe River nourish the national park, which is also home to a wide range of other wildlife, including smaller mammals, birds, reptiles, and myriad insects. The Udawalawe National Park lies on the boundary of Sri Lanka’s wet and dry zones. This gives it a unique ecology, and a sense of beauty that surpasses most other national parks in the country.

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Sri Lanka’s diverse and colourful wildlife never cease to amaze and confound, and provide insights into the wonder of nature and how it, and its many creations, adapts to change. Most of Sri Lanka’s popular National Parks are located in the dry zone, which is prone to long periods of drought and short but voluminous bouts of rain. The Yala and Wilpattu National Parks, the most popular and second-most popular among local and international tourists, respectively for Leopard Safaris, offer wildlife experiences throughout the year that are bound to amaze and excite even the most experienced of naturalists.

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Have you ever imagine it is possible to get a high quality services in the forest area? Let me tell you it would be possible when you are going to Yala National Park with Mahoora.

Normally, we can find some luxury services in the hotel or some good restaurants. However, you can still feel the same in the nature. Every staffs in the Yala National Park are so sweet and warm, all of them got a warm smile to welcome customers. Customers will feel like back home when they arrive the National Park. It is a good remark for the journal.

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Udawalawe Elephant Safaris with Mahoora

For winding paths, and bending trees,
For surreal moments, for the eyes to see,
When the nature is your only home,
Wild and free, proud, they roam.

Introduction

Have you ever imagined what freedom feels like? Have you ever got so close to an elephant that you can look right into his eyes? Have you ever felt a connection with an animal standing at touching distance from you? Mahoora makes these surreal moments come true, with its unique evening jungle Safaris.

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Reaffirming its commitment to the environment and in line with eco-friendly and sustainable practices, the tents themselves are fabricated in Sri Lanka using locally-sourced environmentally-friendly material of the highest standards. In fact, Mahoora also takes pride in being the world’s first carbon neutral mobile tented safari camp company and has taken steps to offset its comparably low operational footprint for the betterment of the environment.

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Elephant Transit Home

Before I checked into the campsite, however, I made a quick stop over at the Elephant Transit Home (ETH) to meet my friend the Chief Veterinary Surgeon, and head of the ETH Dr. Vijitha Parera. As always it was great to see the 40 odd orphans coming in for their 12 noon milk feed.

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Elephants at Minneriya National Park Sri Lanka

Up to around 300 elephants gather into a large herd during the dry months of July and August for the waters of the Minneriya Reservoir, with the intention of cooling down and quenching thirst. Seeing one elephant in the wild can be a surreal experience. Imagine seeing 300 of them in the wild going about their business, ignoring the gaze of onlookers for the most part.

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Sri Lanka's first bush-walks camp - Ahaspokuna